Why is Reading So Important for Children?

This week my social media has been flooded with talk and images of World Book Day! Whilst my own children’s school didn’t participate in it (pretty disappointing) I did discuss favourite books for an hour with a group of residents at work, as part of my activities that day. And, what I discovered, was that the majority of favourite novels were from books read as children or young teens both at home and in education – it was so lovely to hear and see their passion for them. The excitement when they remembered a long loved class.

I found it truly amazing to see just how loved these stories still were well into their 80’s and 90’s. 

Reading is a crucial aspect of any child’s education and one that can be fun too as they delve into adventures and the lives of characters with in the pages of books. Being one of the first things they learn how to do in school and something that is featured heavily across all subjects areas every single day, it’s no wonder lots of people consider reading to be a form of entertainment too; a way to relax and wind down after a busy day. Arguably, reading is much more beneficial for a child than sitting in front of the TV for hours on end, or playing some form of video game (though in moderation these can also enrich their lives). But, reading is a timeless pursuit and one that increases many skills beyond entertainment. In fact an independent co-educational school in Somerset has explored the many advantages of reading in detail which you might be interested in. 

Reading Benefits 

One  benefit of reading, which is often overlooked, is that it’s great for improving general knowledge. Even fictional novels will allow your child to learn about various historical events, different cultural backgrounds and the multitude of traditions across the world. General knowledge is important in many ways and will even help your child socialise better with new people; after all, they will always have something to talk about.

Whether your child chooses to read fiction books, magazines, newspapers or even blog entries, reading is sure to help them develop a substantial vocabulary that will serve them well; not only when communicating verbally but also when writing. These are fantastic skills to have and will help your child perform well throughout their education, as well as in the future when the time comes for them to start applying to jobs. Another benefit to reading is increased concentration. As adults we know that the ability to focus on something for a long period of time is a vital skill both at school and within their personal lives and future work, and so is something that will be beneficial in exams, meetings and life.

If you’re wondering how to encourage your child to find an interest in reading, then might I suggest you begin with sharing your favourites with them. It is wonderful, as I have found at work, to reminisce about what you loved about that particular book or it’s characters. We also have fun visiting the library each month and so, it would be worth taking a trip to your local library and exploring the various options available to your child there. It can also be a good idea to ask your child or their friends which subjects they enjoy or books they are reading too – this will help you choose an appropriate book or other form of text for them to read around their age range and interests. 

Reading is so important for children’s development and working with elderly, I can see just how much that passion and these precious tales stay with them throughout their lives. It enriches, educates and brings a lot of joy.

*collaborative post

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